Recent Changes

Thursday, January 15

  1. page Actor's Packet edited ... I just found: Actors found:Actors may also ... throughout Japan. After After Kan’a…
    ...
    I just found: Actorsfound:Actors may also
    ...
    throughout Japan.
    After

    After
    Kan’ami passed
    ...
    of Noh.
    Toward

    Toward
    the end
    ...
    years old.
    Why This Play Then?
    Zeami’s possible inspiration for writing “Lady Han”
    ...
    Cool winds overcoming the summer heat.
    Discarded into a box,
    ...
    before fulfillment.
    [In the poem] Ban Jieyu comapes herself to an autumn fan discarded after the summer heat. The expression ‘autumn fan’ came to mean a discarded lover.”
    Zeami on “Flowering”
    ...
    “The seed of the flower that blossoms out in all works of art lies in the artist’s soul. Just as the transparent crystal produces fire and water…a superb artist creates a moving work of art out of a landscape within his soul. It is such a person that can be called a vessel. Make numerous things the vessel of the universe, and set it in the spacious, tranquil way of the void. You will then be able to attain the ultimate of art, the Mysterious Flower.”
    -Zeami’s Kadensho, explaining the artist’s role
    ...
    and hana.
    Monomane: “A thorough personification of a being that one is endeavoring to portray…Here it is the spirit that counts. A mere external imitation of an object would make the result “masterless” while by “feeling it with heart and soul to make it one’s own,” we would have the outcome mastered.
    Monomane thus suggested imitation of the essence of an individual. [The actors] sought a balance between portraying a particular individual and communicating the universal essence of that person.
    ...
    The question remains how far women can succeed in Noh. Some people think the tradition should change to accommodate women. "Women need to make their own Noh style and design their own plays," says Noh actor and teacher Yasunori Umewaka, 53. "So far, women have been imitating the men's movements, and this has been accepted, but it's still different." Umewaka admits that a women's Noh revolution will take years. Many men and women alike prefer the traditional form, and resistance remains strong. "It's up to women to change this," he says. "It's the only way for them to be truly successful in Noh." Yoko Layer is certainly doing her part. She hopes to use her art to bring comfort to her struggling compatriots. "Japanese are going through a tough time," she says. "There are so many suicides now. If I could combine the egoless Noh style with Western-style Method acting, it could be a powerful healing experience for audiences." Umewaka says Layer may be just the kind of role model that Noh needs. "For women in Noh, a gifted leader needs to emerge," he says. "Perhaps someone like Yoko Layer, who young people can look to and say, 'She's cool.'"
    Jo-ha-kyū
    {http://www.albisteam.ch/grafik/Jo%20Ha%20Kyu9.jpg}
    Zeami

    Zeami
    used Jo-ha-kyū
    ...
    still forceful).
    In Zeami’s opinion, if the kyū is too long, the play probably won’t turn out well. In performance, it is the ha that should last a long while. In the ha, one offers up the full variety of performance, so the kyū usually should be devoted exclusively to the climax.
    Shite
    {http://www.colleenlanki.com/Performance/PerfJane.jpg}
    Shite, which means “doer” or “performer,” is often used by Zeami to mean “actor.” In Nō, it has come to mean the central actor in a play, and Zeami sometimes intends it in the latter meaning as well.
    Waki
    {http://www.corbisimages.com/images/67/FEDE6E8F-6631-489F-AD10-B107DB84E911/RJ001542.jpg}

    {http://www.corbisimages.com/images/67/FEDE6E8F-6631-489F-AD10-B107DB84E911/RJ001542.jpg}

    As Zeami uses the term most commonly, waki is the name for the secondary role in a play. This role is generally that of a priest, wondering through the country to see what he cane see. The waki comes on stage at the beginning of a typical play to announce who he is and to set the scene for the appearance of the main character, the shite. The waki’s interaction with the shite is essential to the play and usually reaches a high point in a dialogue in the later “sections” of the play.
    Yūgen
    ...
    Ai-Kyōgen
    {http://www.yoshinoantiques.com/images/usobuki.jpg}
    ...
    okashi (comic).
    Excerpts from Zeami’s Transmitting the Flower Through Effects and Attitudes (the Fushikaden) 1400-1418
    風姿花伝
    ...
    {http://www.japaneselifestyle.com.au/japan_picture/albums/upload/kyoto/shimogamo_shrine/normal_shimogamo_shrine_IMG_623252.JPG}
    Tadasu no-mori: “This lush, green mori or forest is a hallmark of Shimogamo shrine. Its name is so ancient that its history is uncertain; Tadasu may mean either delta or justice. The forest is situated at the river delta, promoting its verdant growth. Yet this forested delta is more than the mere crossroads of rivers. Its neighbors are said to have come to the forest to adjudicate their own conflicts in a system of community justice. Perhaps the name Tadasu is a double-entendre meant to encompass both possibilities. Its trees have been famous throughout the shrine’s history. The delicate flowers of the plum trees and the aromatic blossoms of the cherry trees have inspired many visitors. The acclaimed artist Korin Ogata (1658-1716) immortalized the plum trees in his folding screen Red and White Plum Flowers, now a national treasure. The most famous cherry tree is a specimen of Yama-zakura, or mountain cherry tree, that stands in front of the vermillion gate of the forest. The forest today spans over 12 hectares and is well protected by both national and international measures. The Tadasu-no-mori Foundation protects this natural environment and educates community members about the forest on April 29th, Green Day in Japan. It is a National Historic site, a Natural Heritage site, and a U.N. World Cultural Heritage site of its own right.”
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d2/Tadasu_no_mori_200906a.jpg/220px-Tadasu_no_mori_200906a.jpg}
    Mitarishi Brook: (also known as Mitarashi River) it weaves around the Shimogamo Shrine. “On the Day of the Ox (18 days before the first day of autumn), the Mitarashi Pond becomes the stage for a ritual uses the river’s ‘powers’ to protect visitors from disease and disasters.”
    {http://lh6.ggpht.com/_EBI6OLFuyUA/StJqzqVFJXI/AAAAAAAAAtY/h5oJt7biHaU/.JPG}
    Mount Fuji: “Mount Fuji (Fujisan) is with 3776 meters Japan's highest mountain. It is not surprising that the nearly perfectly shaped volcano has been worshipped as a sacred mountain and experienced big popularity among artists and common people. Mount Fuji is a dormant volcano, which most recently erupted in 1708. Note however, that clouds and poor visibility often block the view of Mount Fuji, and you have to consider yourself lucky if you get a clear view of the mountain. Visibility tends to be better during the colder seasons of the year than in summer, and in the early morning and late evening hours.”
    {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_1oFBdt3TwZM/S9IasMB92sI/AAAAAAAAAbI/uLyGDGyLi_o/s1600/Cherry_Blossoms_And_Mount_Fuji,_Japan.jpg}
    Shirakawa Barrier: (Shirakawa no seki) is situated in a park to the south of the city, and is believed to be the site of the ancient barrier between the unconquered north and the capital region of Kanto to the south.
    {http://wwwdelivery.superstock.com/WI/223/4034/PreviewComp/SuperStock_4034-2017.jpg}
    Kasuga Moor: Based on the translation, it is unclear which “Kasuga” is being referred to here. Most likely, Kasuga was a small village that neighbored Nogami, in Mino Province.
    Ashigara, Hakone, Tamatsushima: The deities (Shinto) are the incarnations of Buddhist divinities. These gods were all associated with preserving the ties between men and women.
    Kibune and Miwa: two of the twenty-two Shinto shrines ranked highest by the Imperial government. They were partially chosen due to their proximity to the capital of Kyoto. Both Kibune and Miwa are located on mountains north of Kyoto. The Kibune shrine, which is 1500 years old, is pictured below:
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d2/Kibune_Shrine.jpg}
    Palanquin:
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/92/Palanquin_%28PSF%29.png} Martin Clunes http://www.amazon.com/Martin-Clunes-From-Doctor-Who-ebook/dp/B00A5FEFHY
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/92/Palanquin_%28PSF%29.png}

    (view changes)

Wednesday, December 21

  1. 1:15 pm

Monday, November 29

  1. page Text edited TITLES (to try in 11/29 rehearsal) PROLOGUE All enter “Kyogen: A brief comic interlude played …
    TITLES (to try in 11/29 rehearsal)
    PROLOGUE
    All enter
    “Kyogen: A brief comic interlude played before a Noh drama.”
    Chorus lifts lights
    SCENE ONE
    Final clap of line dance
    “Jo: The beginning that slowly builds toward the action.”
    5/4 Lindsay speaks
    SCENE THREE
    Trevor sits
    “Shite Entrance: The slow and spectacular reveal of the play’s main actor.”
    Mariah begins
    SCENE FOUR
    Shopping cart “ba-dum” off the edge
    “Ha: An urgent transition to the climax”
    Sound of branch beginning
    SCENE FIVE
    Jessie puts on her shoes
    “Kyu: The brief and final action that leaves no room for any other resolution.”
    “Where are you? Excuse me is anyone around?”

    We're thinking of using some anthropological narration at the beginning, like
    Here's the Prologue / Kyogen scene:
    (view changes)
  2. page Actor's Packet edited Actors (especially trevor) Trevor) read this, ... straight ahead. -Katie Zeami -KatieZeami …
    Actors (especially trevor)Trevor) read this,
    ...
    straight ahead. -Katie
    Zeami
    -KatieZeami Motokiyo (c.1363-c.1443)
    {zeami_1L.jpg} Arguably the greatest playwright of Japanese Noh theatre, Zeami’s involvement in the art form began from birth. Zeami’s father, Kan’ami Kiyotsugu (c.1333-c.1384) was a leader of one of the four main theatre in Japan and was considered a tremendous innovator who contributed to the current state of Noh. Kan’ami “emphasized the rhythmic nature of the musical accompaniment, developed greater use of mime acting, and correlated dance and musical elements more closely with a dramatic plot” (Worthen 141). As a child, Zeami began his training by performing small rolls in Kan’ami’s productions and was quickly regarded as a child prodigy. Zeami especially impressed the shogun (military dictator of Japan) Yoshimitsu, and soon after the two became very close friends (and lovers). Zeami’s relationship with Yoshimitsu not only saved Kan’ami’s troupe but also helped his own plays to be produced throughout Japan.
    After Kan’ami passed away, Zeami at age twenty took over the leadership role of the troupe and acted as its “resident playwright,” stage director, and his plays’ protagonist (shite) -and it soon became the most influential in Japan. “Kan’ami’s innovations were explored and formalized by Zeami, who wrote or revised more than 100 of the 241 plays that make up the Noh repertoire and described the philosophical, aesthetic, and practical goals of Noh performance in several theoretical essays” (Worthen 141). During the peak of his career Zeami wrote the “Fushi kaden” (c.1418), which was a type of manual for his successors and other theatre practitioners written in order to preserve the high standards of Noh.
    ...
    Kibune and Miwa: two of the twenty-two Shinto shrines ranked highest by the Imperial government. They were partially chosen due to their proximity to the capital of Kyoto. Both Kibune and Miwa are located on mountains north of Kyoto. The Kibune shrine, which is 1500 years old, is pictured below:
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d2/Kibune_Shrine.jpg}
    Palanquin:
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/92/Palanquin_%28PSF%29.png}
    (view changes)
  3. page Actor's Packet edited Actors (especially trevor) read this, which I just found: Actors may also be present on stage even…
    Actors (especially trevor) read this, which I just found: Actors may also be present on stage even when they are not actively participating in the stage action. By convention the //waki//, seated at his pillar in front of the chorus, does not see or hear the shite's first entrance scene. In many plays the waki has no actions after the first or second scene of the second act, yet he remains on stage through the play paying no attention to the shite's performance;5 he keeps an expressionless face, sitting as motionless as possible and staring straight ahead. -Katie
    Zeami Motokiyo (c.1363-c.1443)
    {zeami_1L.jpg} Arguably the greatest playwright of Japanese Noh theatre, Zeami’s involvement in the art form began from birth. Zeami’s father, Kan’ami Kiyotsugu (c.1333-c.1384) was a leader of one of the four main theatre in Japan and was considered a tremendous innovator who contributed to the current state of Noh. Kan’ami “emphasized the rhythmic nature of the musical accompaniment, developed greater use of mime acting, and correlated dance and musical elements more closely with a dramatic plot” (Worthen 141). As a child, Zeami began his training by performing small rolls in Kan’ami’s productions and was quickly regarded as a child prodigy. Zeami especially impressed the shogun (military dictator of Japan) Yoshimitsu, and soon after the two became very close friends (and lovers). Zeami’s relationship with Yoshimitsu not only saved Kan’ami’s troupe but also helped his own plays to be produced throughout Japan.
    ...
    Ashigara, Hakone, Tamatsushima: The deities (Shinto) are the incarnations of Buddhist divinities. These gods were all associated with preserving the ties between men and women.
    Kibune and Miwa: two of the twenty-two Shinto shrines ranked highest by the Imperial government. They were partially chosen due to their proximity to the capital of Kyoto. Both Kibune and Miwa are located on mountains north of Kyoto. The Kibune shrine, which is 1500 years old, is pictured below:
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d2/Kibune_Shrine.jpg}
    Palanquin: {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/92/Palanquin_%28PSF%29.png}

    Palanquin:
    {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/92/Palanquin_%28PSF%29.png}

    (view changes)

Friday, November 26

  1. page Sound experiments edited Lady Han Theme: As of 11_26_10 5/4 Fall Moment (For Lindsey): As of 11_26_10
    Lady Han Theme:
    As of 11_26_10

    5/4 Fall Moment (For Lindsey):
    As of 11_26_10
    (view changes)
    12:17 pm
  2. page Sound experiments edited 5/4 Fall Moment (For Lindsey): As of 11_26_10 Shite entrance music: "All I Want for Chr…
    5/4 Fall Moment (For Lindsey):
    As of 11_26_10

    Shite entrance music:
    "All I Want for Christmas Is You" by Anthony and Mariah Carey: ,
    (view changes)
    11:51 am

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